About your Search

20130201
20130228
SHOW
Book TV 86
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 402
MSNBC 358
FOXNEWSW 357
FOXNEWS 315
CNNW 276
CNN 250
CSPAN 232
FBC 222
CSPAN2 202
WRC 180
WJLA 140
WTTG 139
WUSA (CBS) 139
CNBC 118
KQED (PBS) 116
SFGTV2 116
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 4706
Spanish 10
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 4,724 (some duplicates have been removed)
us at s f gvment gov tv dot ordinary care an and before i be a slave i'll be buried in my grave and go home to my lord and be free no more violence no more violence no more violence over me over me and before i be a slave i'll be buried in my grave and go home to my lord and be free >> i want y'all to sing it with me now. ♪ oh, oh, freedom oh, freedom o freedom over me over me and before i be a slave i'll be buried in my grave and go home to my lord and be free (applause) >> thank you. >> thank you very much. thank you. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i'm al williams, president of the board of directors of san francisco african-american historical and cultural society. on behalf of the society and our co-presenters, the san francisco african-american chamber of commerce, the bayview ymca, senator mark leno's office, the san francisco public library, and the mayor's office of neighborhood services, welcome to the 2013 black history month program. the 2013 black history month theme is "at the crossroads of freedom and equality, the emancipation proclamation and the march o
of our operating revenue from membership dues f. you're not a member of the society, please join us or renew your membership today. i should note that anyone who joins or renews a membership today will receive a free autographed copy of our keynote speaker's new book, the title of which is martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr. we have a terrific program planned for you today. of course, the heart of the program will be our speaker, will be the remarks of our keynote speaker dr. claiborne parson. you have a program in front of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be ab
, and the county for building. for any athletic field and neighborhood parks, call 831- 5510. you can also write us at permits and reservations. or walking in and say hello at old log cabin, golden gate park. and of course you can find more information at sfrecpark.org. >> the renovation of balboa park, the oldest in the city of san francisco, and now it is the newest part in the city of san francisco. through our partnership, and because of public investment from the two thousand eight fund, we are celebrating a renewal and an awakening of this park. we have it safer, happier, more joyous. >> 3, 2, 1, [laughter] =--[applause] >> it is a great resource for families, to have fun in the city, recreation. >> this is an amazing park. we have not revitalized it without public and private investment. the critical piece of the process of this renovation was that it was all about the community. we reached out to everyone in this community. we love this park dearly and they all had thoughts and ideas and they wanted to bring their own creativity and their personality to bear on the design. what you see is w
as the many challenges that still face us in that country. i have spent a great deal of time thinking about what my role is in in afghanistan. let me take a few minutes to tell you a little bit about siga. is a special inspector general for afghan reconstruction. it is the only agency in the entire united states government whose mission is reconstruction in afghanistan. nothing else. we are unique. we had the unique authority to examine any project by any government agency operating in afghanistan dealing with reconstruction. we can look at the department of defense, department of state, department of justice, at any agency in afghanistan. we have the largest oversight presence on the ground in afghanistan. we have the most aggressive program. we also have the most successful record of working with afghan law enforcement in prosecuting interesting individuals in afghan courts. we are a temporary agency. we go out of existence. we sunset. when reconstruction drops below 250 million dollars. we are in the billions right now. we have some very unique contacting authorities. it allows us to get
about. my concern is turning the property into restaurant use and with all the nuisance that goes along with, that the machine noise from the restaurants, loud music, loud voices, public urination, et cetera. we already have a very large density of restaurants and bars in the area. i would like to understand what is to stop the rest of the building from falling into restaurant use, if this changes? if ever the castro country club should leave, there is a space there with the backyard patio space, that if that ever turned into a restaurant the quality of my neighbors and my building would be compromised such that we would have to move and sell your properties. we made a choice to live in an urban areas with all the benefits and problems that go with that. my boys go to sleep every night with the hum of the restaurant machines and disco beat from the bars and restaurants and we're fine with the existing level of if any place, but we don't want anymore. the existing restaurant is already encroaching on existing space and they are in violation and out of permit. as someone allude to ir, t
demographics and birthrates could cause the u.s. to lose its place as a world leader sunday night at 9 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. and look for more online. like us on facebook. >> next on booktv, paul dickson presents a collection of words popularized by american presidents including warren g. harding's founding fathers invoked during his presidential campaign, theodore roosevelt's use of the word muckraker in a speech critical of specific journalists, and military industrial complex delivered by president eisenhower during his final presidential address to the american public in 1961. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i've been playing around with words for a long time, and i think when i was a kid, one of my -- i wasn't that athletic, and i wasn't that, you know, smart in various ways, but i could always go home and memorize a couple words, so i would learn words like apathetic and things like that. you know, for a third grader, it was a lot of fun. and as i got to be an older person, i got really fascinated by doing some tricks with words. one of m
. republican senator lindsey graham has revealed he says the death toll in u.s. drone war overseas. at a speech in south carolina wednesday night, he said -- his comments mark the first time a u.s. official has offered a figure for those killed in nearly a decade of u.s. drone strikes abroad. the 4700 figure matches the high end of an estimate by the bureau of investigative journalism, which extensively has covered the strikes. the news comes as the obama administration continues to stonewall members of congress on fully releasing the justice department memos explaining the legal rationale for targeted killings overseas. the white house agreed to a least partially disclose the memos earlier this month after a senate uproar amid the conformation hearings for cia nominee john brennan. but the new york times reports the administration has adopted a strategy of continuing to deny senators full access while simultaneously negotiating with republicans to reveal more information on the deadly u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. the strategy appears focused on ensuring the white house has enough votes f
by giving us a snapshot of the samsung corporation. >> it is now the largest technology company in the world by sales. we cover components all the way through to finished goods like home appliances, televisions and smartphones. so you will see a whole range of products at the booth where we are showing audio systems, home appliances, televisions, the whole range of electronic products. >> what is your position at samsung, for what are you response snble >> i'm responsible for our corporate strategy in north america america and looking at all of our corporate strategies across that. so overseeing all the product areas and strategies. >> you spent quite a few years in korea, correct? >> yes. why are you now in the snates >> probably they got tired of me and said i need a breather. but it's interesting when you've been in the headquarters. you've seen global responsibility but looking at narrower product lines. but in coming to the u.s., i can look at all the product lines in one geographic market. it's a different way of look k at the business. much more in the trenches than in the headquarter
. and this president has made unprecedented use of them. nbc news has obtained a government document that lays out the legal argument to justify the president's use of drones to kill al qaeda suspects, including, in some cases, u.s. citizens. our national investigative correspondent michael isikoff broke the story and has our report. >> reporter: drones have been called president obama's weapon of choice. during his four years as commander in chief, u.s. military and cia drone strikes have accelerated at an unprecedented pace. more than 400 cia strikes against targets in pakistan and yemen. eight times as many as under president bush. >> they have been very precise, precision strikes against al qaeda and their affiliates. >> these strikes are legal. they are ethical. and they are wise. >> reporter: but today, new questions about drone strikes targeting american citizens, including anwar al awlaki. born in new mexico and killed in yemen in 2011. he allegedly directed the so-called underwear bomber, who tried to blow up an airliner over detroit in 2009. but awlaki was never charged with a crime. nbc
(instrumental music) >> for 63 years the u.s. has been part of the nato alliance, but is nato still an important safeguard for americans or is it simply a money pit? >> the nato relationship is enormously important to us. i think it was winston churchill said something to the affect that the only worst thing than, than going to war with allies is to go to war without allies. >> we're dealing with network global threats and if we don't provide a network global response we're always gonna to be on the back foot. >> what we need is not just nato on the conventional defense side, we need a nato alliance for economic statecraft. >> the problem is that it is an alliance that is largely sustained by american defense spending. (instrumental music) >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society f
>>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." >>> barack obama has some unfinished business. the u.s. president says the hard work of millions of americans has not been rewarded and he says it's time to reunite the engine of economic growth. he promised to work on behalf of the middle class in his state of the union address. >> it is our unfinished task to restore the basic bargain that built this country, the idea that if you work hard and meet your responsibilities, you can get ahead, no matter where you come from, no matter what you look like or who you love. >> obama made the address before a joint session of congress. he said his first priority is making the country a magnet for new jobs in manufacturing. he said some of those jobs could come through investment and clean energy. he said the extreme weather americans have seen should remind them they need to do more to combat climate change. obama said america will remain the anchor of strong alliances around the world, as he outlined threats from abroad. he criticized north korean leaders a day after they carried out another nuc
is flying to washington for his first talks with u.s. president barack obama since he took office in december. their agenda is packed and their discussions are expected to touch on everything from a wide-ranging free trade deal to punishing north korea. >> translator: i want the summit talks to show the international community that japan and the united states have restored the strong bond of their alliance. >> abe says that alliance became unstable during the former democratic party-led administration. he says he's going to talk to obama about the u.s.-led negotiations for the transpacific partnership. nations that joined the discussions for the free trade agreement are supposed to in principle eliminate all tariffs, but abe doesn't want to abide by the precondition. abe and obama are expected to share ideas on what to do about north korea. scientists in the country last week carried out their third nuclear test. the leaders are expected to agree to push for a u.n. security council resolution imposing new sanctions on pyongyang. >>> government officials say the prime minister will
that it doesn't do anything the u.s. doesn't like or one which apparently on the surface has more love for it. at the same time it's disengaged. it's not fair for ambassador rice. her engagement is where it should be. she's living day and night in the accident occurty council that's where she should be. i think that those probably warfare criticism during the first two to three years of the first barack obama term. >> host: when has the u.s. sought u.n. legitimacy? >> guest: most of the time as a per let to actions that it was planning on taking anyway. so in iraq, we saw legitimacy for something the entire world knew we were going do no matter what. i would say that the u.s. seeks a less contentious program which is -- [inaudible] peace keeping operations in places in the world where we can't operate others and put our people at risk. and yet, both for reasons of our interest and values and ideals. we think it would be a good idea if somebody on the ground to maintain amenable oil. i think we see u.s. legitimacy for purpose where our -- >> host: and you write in the book living with the u.n.
. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ >>> i'm s.e. cupp. right now on "the cycle," we're spinning the wheel of miss fortune. today, it lands on sequester siesta. wake up. >> i'm toure, if it's tuesday, it's beat the press. the white house loves that game. and sneaking out to play a little golf with tiger woods. >>> i'm kristal ball. had has gender equality hit a -- >> and i'm steve kornacki. put that in your pipe and smoke it. >> oh, twitter pics of steve catching a quick siesta in the office before we air are always a hit. >> yeah. >> here's one from this morning. >> catching a few zs. >> this is a habit. >> is this is the pot segment -- >> yes, it is. >> this one happens to be my favorite. that was from a month or so ago when i caught him slumped down in his chair. you'll notice a couch right behind him. >> yeah, i'm raising six kids, right? >> that couch is really unc
>> first of all, i would like to say that korea, south korea is the most important neighbor for us. and the president-elect, i have had -- i have met her twice and i have had a meal with her. my grandfather was best friends with her father. at the same time, the president was someone very close with japan, obviously. but we do have the territorial issue between japan and the united states. japan and korea, sorry. even with those issues, the economic relationship is very strong. the people to people exchange is very strong. the ties with japan and korea is something that cannot be severed. i think the relationship that we have which south korea is extremely important, the cooperation we can achieve between these two countries. we can try to work to resolve these issues and have a good relationship with three out. -- with korea. we are planning to dispatch the vice prime minister and finance minister to participate in the ceremony on the 5th of february. >> thank you for a speech with so many good sound bites. are there things you would like to have the united states say or do? have
, not as many as hoped for or expected. nbc's tom costello starts us off in our washington newsroom tonight with what all of this might mean. tom, good evening. >> hi, brian. the good news, anyone with retirement money invested in stocks has made back much of what they lost during the great recession and the wall street selloff, about $8 trillion. a big rally on wall street today, with the dow back over 14,000. a lot has changed since the last time it crossed that mark on october 12th, 2007. within a year, lehman brothers and bear stearns failed. housing prices went off a cliff. the unemployment rate went from 4.7% to 10% before falling back to 7.9% today. in portland, oregon this week, more than 900 people applied for 160 new jobs at two new hardware stores. >> 80% of the people we saw were -- had been out of work for three months to up to two years. >> reporter: julie ober has been out of work for 16 months. >> my last job was front desk at a pain management company. and just -- i actually got sick. and couldn't be there any longer. >> reporter: nationwide, some 12 million americans are s
prohibiting the use of coffee and coca-cola -- cola in the world. this is a little over an hour as they discuss the invitation of its use worldwide. >> could please turn on that. thank you. we are going to be talking about coffee, and cola and the ingredients in cola. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths through much profit and how they make their way into the united states and what the u.s. government's role has been in ensuring that they come into this country. this evening, we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. without further ado, i would like to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out here. i am so excited. it is great to be here in new york. i'm going to start off by talking about my book, and then we will go into what focuses this week and what is going on with the u.n. that basically prohibits this around the world. back in 2004 and 2005, i did a book about marijuana. it wasn't about how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to t
. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead and increase harvest and feed the whole world. sometimes these innovations come from the most advanced science. other times they are simple steps and ideas that come from looking at and listening closely to the problem. all of them can break down barriers to food security. it can allow us to allow new paths of progress. -- plow entirely new pass to progress. we need those new pathways forward. take a look at a few recent headlines. "drought and mississippi impacts everything from livestock to deer." "food shortages could force the world into vegetarians." "patent endings raises new biotech issues." "global crop production shows signs of stagnant." "could climate change be al qaeda's best friend in africa?" i could go on. when i think of the factors that make up the perfect storm, i'm reminded of what mark twain reportedly observed. by land, they're not making it anymore. i wish twain was right. the truth is, global warming is making less. we need to do more land that we still have. every year 7 billion of us on earth use th
are delighted to have the prime minister here. this is an exciting time for us. we know of his leadership through the years and we are really delighted to have him here. we are excited that he can be with us today. i would especially like to say words of thanks for our colleagues. we are delighted to have you here, a senior advisor to the prime minister is here. the deputy chief and cabinet secretary. the ambassador is here, one of my bosses. i have to recognize him. a great service for america and japan, we are delighted to have you here. and the governor from alaska, he is our closest state to japan and has the keenest interest in japan. it is wonderful to have you here, governor. there is a new word in washington, the new economics that prime minister abe is bringing to japan. we have to get ourselves started again and i think that is exactly what he is doing in japan. i would like to take a second, talk about the foreign-policy agenda. japan's foreign policy going forward to protect freedom of thought, expression, and speech in the asia-pacific. can you think of anything more importan
in your home state. that is the way it used to work and we can make it work that way again. there are a number of things we have to do immediately. we may disagree on how to dress them but not the need for them to be addressed. each of you are making different decisions you are grappling with it. i do not think there is much much difference. i'm not mad a governor from the time of implementing the recovery act and on now who does not think we have to do something about our infrastructure. there is very little disagreement on the need too build an education that has such immense possibilities for our people. most of these issues were united by more than what divides us. these all intersect at a place where both the state and federal governments engage. we are going to have to work together. they overlap, in many cases. we will have our differences. we should all agree that the united states has to have the highest percentage of college graduates of any nation in the world. everyone disagrees. some of you governors have led the way an early education and the consequences for
in the head at this metro bus stop. the witness accounts and using this surveillance video, police andked down the suspect under second-degree murder charges. >> he was stabbed. he appeared drunk or high. we think that he saw that he and exhibitedred hate. >> they want the justice department to investigate and take over the case. intent is difficult to prove in any murder prosecution. >> there is an assistant to it a justice department policy advisor. she says defining a hate crime is not easy. it really depends on the jurisdiction. . >> there are many questions. i think all of the facts need and thet on the table decision reached as to why or this is or not a hate crime. that u.s. attorney office has declined to comment. prosecutors will have to prove killed jonesry specifically because he was transgendered. the government faces a first- charge. we are told a hate crime conviction would not add to jail time. satellitess -- and a center, richard reeve, abc 7 news. he claimed he was mistreated during his sentence for an assault. he was heldce says confinement and denied medical care. use signab
killed in a blast in the turkish capital outside the u.s. embassy. smoke has been seen from the side entrance of the building. we will get the latest from the scene. a motorway bridge collapses in china, where a truck packed with fireworks exploded. in mexico city, 25 people have been killed in an explosion at the state oil company. rescuers are trying to help the many that were trapped. can australian do enough to stop the united nations from stripping the great barrier reef of its world heritage status? also, looking at what's happening in business news. and jobs in the usa. >> the american economy is shrinking. employment, hoping for 160,000 new jobs to have been created. we will get the manufacturing reports later today as well. >> its 12 noon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, 2:00 in the afternoon in turkey. if we start with breaking news. there's been an explosion in front of the u.s. embassy in turkey and one person has been killed. there's no indication as to what caused the explosion in a neighborhood that's home to a number of foreign missions. let's get the latest from o
a majority of the u.s. senate has voted to confirm chuck hagel to be the next secretary of defense. the standoff over one of president obama's most contention nominations came to an end when senators put the nomination up for a full vote. republicans held up the vote in part because of their demands for more answers related to the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. he will replace leon panetta. >> you heard about the debate over cell phones and whether they could cause cancer. you probably haven't heard about the steps a growing number of people that are worried about it are taking right now. kristin fisher is going to take us to a remote town in west virginia to meet some of those wireless refugees. >> eventually, seeing people using cellular phones may seem as common place as someone checking time on a watch. >> when cell phones first hit the u.s. market in the mid 80s, there were a few thousand subscribers. today, there are more cell phones than there are people. 322million. on top of that, 20 million americans now use wireless enabled laptops, tablets, modems, and tha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 4,724 (some duplicates have been removed)